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Leading Organizations to Health
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Practical applications of complexity principles in organizational change A 10-month program on change leadership, integrating leading edge theories (from complexity, relational coordination, positive psychology, adult development and other domains) advanced facilitation skills and peer coaching. Four sessions at Rocky Mountain, monthly calls. Visit www.lohweb.com or email asuchman@rchcweb.com to learn more. Tony Suchman and Diane Rawlins

9/1/2014
When: 9/1/2014
Where: Peacefull Valley Ranch
Allenspark, Colorado 
United States
Presenter: Tony Suchman, Diane Rawlins
Contact: Tony Suchman

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Practical applications of complexity principles in organizational change

Leading Organizations to Health is a 10-month program on change leadership that integrates leading edge theories (from complexity, relational coordination, positive psychology, adult development and other domains) with advanced facilitation skills and peer coaching, all in a highly experiential and reflective learning environment. It takes place over the course of 4 long weekends at a Rocky Mountain guest ranch, plus monthly coaching calls. The next cohort (our 8th!) starts in October. If you are interested in building your capacity as a change leader and putting your complexity perspective to practical and powerful use, we’d love to have you join us. Visit www.lohweb.com or email asuchman@rchcweb.com to learn more.

Many of us who are associates and friends of Plexus Institute, co-sponsor of this program, find ourselves increasingly involved in organizational change work. That should be no surprise. Encouraging people to adopt a complexity perspective is itself a major change project, disseminating a new paradigm. And complexity focuses attention on interpersonal process, which, as demonstrated by abundant evidence, affects every dimension of organizational performance. Improving performance requires improving relationships and organizational culture. Medical homes, ACO’s and other structures of care integration succeed or fail based on the quality of their relational cores. Once we’ve started to notice interpersonal dynamics we can’t help but to want to make them better. Still, there’s a big difference between seeing that something needs to change and knowing how to change it. We can’t just invoke the concept of self-organization; constructive change doesn’t just happen by itself nor does it happen by top down design and control. So what else is there? There’s more to learn if we are going to lead change effectively.

Tony Suchman and Diane Rawlins

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